Caribbean Food Near Me – Colombian cuisine

Caribbean food near me

Colombian cuisine is a compound of the culinary traditions of the six main regions within the country (Pacific, Amazonian, Andean, Orinoco, Caribbean, and Insular). Colombian cuisine varies regionally and is particularly influenced by Indigenous ColombianSpanish,[1] and African cuisines,[2] with slight Arab influence in some regions.[3] Furthermore, being one of the most biodiverse countries in the world, Colombia has one of the widest variety of available ingredients depending on the region.

 

History Of Colombian Food

Colombian food is a unique blend of indigenous and European traditions with a strong Afro-Caribbean influence. The two largest indigenous groups prior to European conquest were the Tairona, who lived along the Caribbean coast, and the Muisca, who lived in the highlands to the South.[4] Arepas, made from ground corn, are one of the oldest cooked dishes in Colombian cuisine. It is believed that the name derives from the word for corn in the Chibcha languages.[4] Arepas are a popular modern Colombian dish.

Regional Cuisine

  • There is a large variety of dishes that take into account the difference in regional climates. For example:

    • In the city of Medellín, the typical dish is the bandeja paisa. It includes beansriceground meat or carne asadachorizofried eggarepa, and chicharrón. It is usually accompanied by avocadotomato, and special sauces.
    • In the city of Cali, the most traditional dish is “sancocho de gallina” – a soup composed mostly of chickenplantaincorncoriander, yuca root, and other seasonings. Sancocho is usually served with a portion of rice, tostadas (fried plantains), and a chicken leg covered in hogao (a tomato and onion sauce). The city is also known for its empanadas (a fried corn dough filled with potatoes and meat), marranitas / puerquitas (a fried ball of plantain filled with chicharron, also known as pork rinds), pandebono (a delicious cheese bread made with yucca dough), and aborrajados (sweet ripe fried plantains filled with cheese and served with guava paste).
    • In Bogotá and the Andean region, ajiaco is the traditional dish. It is also a type of soup made of chicken, potatoes, and flavoured with a locally grown herb called “guasca”.
    • In the Caribbean coast, spicy cooking, with fish and lobster, is practiced. Coconut rice is a common dish along the coastal cities. The cuisine of the Caribbean is also influenced by Arab traditions, with dishes such as Kibbeh.
    • In the Llanos, meat from the barbecue, such as the “ternera llanera” is common, and also typical river fishes like the “amarillo”.
    • In the Amazonas, the cuisine is influenced by Brazilian and Peruvian traditions.
    • Inland, the dishes reflect the mix of cultures, inherited mainly from Amerindian and European cuisine, and the produce of the land mainly agriculture, cattle, river fishing, and other animals’ raising. Such is the case of the sancocho soup in Valledupar, the arepas (a corn based bread-like patty). Local species of animals like the guaratinaja, part of the wayuu Amerindian culture.
    • In the Andean region of Nariño, traditional dish is broiled guinea pig (cuy asado), due to influence of inca cuisine.
    • In the Tolima region, the Tamales Tolimenses are a delicacy. These tamales are made of a corn dough and feature peascarrots, potatoes, rice, chicken, pork, and various spices. They are wrapped in plantain leaves and boiled for three to four hours. Pandebono for breakfast with hot chocolate.
    • On the Islands of San Andres, Providencia, and Santa Catalina, the main dish is rondon, a seafood dish made of coconut milk, fish, conch, cassava root (yuca), sweet potato, white yams, and pumpkin seasoned with chili peppers and herbs. They also have a crab soup which is considered a delicacy. It is made with the same ingredients as rondon, without the fish.
    • Ají picante, a spicy raw cilantro-based sauce, is used as a condiment for many dishes and sides, including empanadas, platacones, and soups.

    Piqueteaderos are rustic eateries that serve a variety of fried foods and specialties in platters to share. Offerings can even include huesos cerdos (pig bones), tarta de seso (brain pie) as well as fried dishes, morcilla, corn on the cob, and other Colombian delicacies.

Deserts & Sweets

  • Arequipe (Colombia’s version of the Dulce de Leche, a milk caramel.)
  • Arroz con leche (Sweetened rice with milk).
  • Brevas en dulce – candied figs in syrup or arequipe.
  • Cocadas – baked coconut confection, similar to macaroons.
  • Enyucado cake that has grounded cassava
  • Flan type of custard dessert
  • Bocadillo guava paste
  • Leche asada, similar to flan but less sweet, made with condensed milk.
  • Manjar blanco a boiled, creamy, milk-based spread, thicker than arequipe and sometimes used as a pastry filling.
  • Mazamorra white maize drink
  • Melado, a thick syrup derived from panela.
  • Merenguitos, little hardened meringue “cookies”
  • Milhoja similar to Mille-feuille or Napoleon (literally means thousand layers)
  • Natilla, a Colombian derivation of the Spanish custard natillas, made with milk and cornstarch and spices but without eggs.
  • Pastel de Gloria is a puff pastry containing guava jelly or guava paste and sometimes cheese inside, sprinkled with granulated sugar
  • Postre De Natas, Milk based Colombian pudding literary means milk skin dessert
  • Torta Maria Luisa Orange cake and between layers any berries jam Decorated with icing sugar, there are various variations around South America
  • Tres leches cake, 3 milk cake there are various variations around South America

 

Content c/o Wikipedia

Caribbean Food Near Me

See MENU & Order

Caribbean Food Near Me – Cayman Island cuisine

Caribbean food near me

The culture of the Cayman Islands has been influenced by Afro-Caribbeans of Jamaica, colonists of Great Britain, and more recent immigrants from the United States. In the 21st century, approximately 113 nationalities make up the residents on the three islands comprising the country. The total population of the Cayman Islands consists of slightly more than 55,000 people spread throughout the island group, with the majority of the people found on Grand Cayman. Roughly 20,000 are native Caymanian, with the remainder born elsewhere in the world.

In the past, most of the people of the Cayman Islands got their livelihood from the sea through fishing, turtle harvesting, and as merchant seamen. Cayman Sea Salt and Cayman Logwood products are now locally made and exported.

 

Cuisine

The food of the Cayman Islands includes traditional Afro-Caribbean fare such as cassava, johnny cake, bread fruit, plantain, and meat pie. Jamaican cuisine has also been an influence in the Cayman Islands, and jerk seasoning has become popular for use on meat dishes such as chicken, fish and pork. Curry is also used frequently in rice, chicken, and fish dishes. Traditional Caymanian fare includes dishes made from turtle meat, conch, goat, and fish such as grouper and snapper, with locally made Cayman Sea Salt.

 

 

Content c/o Wikipedia

Caribbean Food Near Me

See MENU & Order

Caribbean Food Near Me – Bermudian cuisine

Caribbean food near me

Bermudian cuisine is the cuisine of the British Overseas Territory of Bermuda. The cuisine of the islands reflects a rich and diverse history and heritage blending British and Portuguese cuisine with preparations of local seafood species, particularly wahoo and rockfish. Traditional dishes include codfish and potatoes served either with an add on of hard boiled egg and butter or olive oil sauce with a banana or in the Portuguese style with tomato-onion sauce, peas and riceHoppin’ Johnpawpaw casserole and fish chowder are also specialties of Bermuda.[1] As most ingredients used in Bermuda’s cuisine are imported, local dishes are offered with a global blend, with fish as the major ingredient, in any food eaten at any time.[2]

 

Main Dishes

There are several dishes served on Bermuda that are unique to the island which offer a taste of traditional Bermudian culture. Fish is one of the main ingredients in Bermudian cuisine. Local fish includes mahi mahisnapperspiny lobster (during September–March), tuna, and wahoo.[2] These are used in dishes such as fish and chips, panfried fish, and boiled salted codfish and potato, a traditional dish in Bermuda (usually served on Sundays with tomato sauce and olive oil).

Fish chowder is considered a national dish, which is a staple food not only in restaurants and hotels but also in homes; the main ingredients are fish stock, fish, vegetables and bacon fat and served with spices, but a Bermudan specialty is to serve it with black rum and sherry peppers.[2][3][4] Beef stock is an essential ingredient in Bermudian fish chowder.[5] Sherry pepper is prepared with ripe and very hot bird peppers using sherry for marinating it, and supplemented with herbs and spices; and black rum is rum derived by blackening with molasses in a special barrel for aging.[2]

The specialty in some restaurants during the week end is a codfish brunch. It is a large serving of full blown codfish, boiled and steamed with salt, and with boiled potatoes, onions, and sliced bananas. The topping is with hard-boiled egg or tomato sauce, and, also occasionally with avocado slices.[2]

Appetizers served are a shark hash and Codfish cakes. Shark hash is minced shark meat, sautéed with spices, and served on toast. Codfish cake is made out of salted cod mash (smashed) and with cooked potatoes and fresh thyme and parsley. Then, it is formed made in to patty and fried on a pan. It is also served with topping of a “zesty fruit salsa and a side of mesclun salad” sandwiched in a white bun with mayonnaise.[2]

Holidays & Festivals

Sweet potato pudding makes use of cinnamoncloves, and lemon or orange juice, and is especially popular on Guy Fawkes Night.[8] Hot cross buns with codfish cakes are a Good Friday fare.[3] Dating to 1612, cassava pie is a Christmas dinner specialty, combining chicken or pork with eggs, brandy and sweet pastry.[8] However, this dish is now offered as a side dish in restaurants on any day. Though every Bermudian family follows its individual recipe, cassava pie includes grated cassava, butters, eggs, salt and sugar. While beef and pork were initially added to chicken for the pie filling, beef and pork are no longer favored.[9] Mussel pie is also a common dish. Its ingredients are shelled mussels, potatoes, and onions. It is served baked and seasoned with thyme, parsley, and curry.[2] Bermuda’s Culinary Arts Festival occurs in November and features celebrity seminars as well as gourmet food demonstrations and tastings.[1

 

Content c/o Wikipedia

Caribbean Food Near Me

See MENU & Order

Caribbean Food Near Me – Belizean cuisine

Caribbean food near me

Belizean cuisine is an amalgamation of all ethnicities in the nation of Belize and their respectively wide variety of foods. Breakfast often consists of sides of bread, flour tortillas, or fry jacks that are often homemade and eaten with various cheeses. All are often accompanied with refried beans, cheeses, and various forms of eggs, etc. Inclusive is also cereal along with milk, coffee, or tea.

Midday meals vary, from lighter foods such as rice and beanstamalespanades (fried meat pies), escabeche (onion soup), chimole/chirmole(soup), stew chicken, garnaches (fried tortillas with beans, cheese, and diced onion sauce or diced cabbage) to various constituted dinners featuring some type of rice and beans, meat and salad or coleslaw.

In the rural areas meals may be more simplified than in the cities. The Maya use recadocorn or maize for most of their meals, and the Garifuna are fond of seafood, cassava (particularly made into cassava bread or Ereba) and vegetables. Belize abounds with restaurants and fast food establishments selling fairly cheaply. Local fruits are quite common, raw vegetables from the markets less so. Mealtime is a communion for families and schools and some businesses close at midday for lunch, reopening later in the afternoon.

 

Popular Dishes

 

Content c/o Wikipedia

Caribbean Food Near Me

See MENU & Order

Caribbean Food Near Me – Bahamian cuisine

Caribbean food near me

Bahamian Cuisine is to the foods and beverages of The Bahamas. It includes seafood such as fish, shellfish, lobster, crab, and conch,[1] as well as tropical fruitsricepeaspigeon peaspotatoes, and pork. Popular seasonings commonly used in dishes include chilies (hot pepper), lime, tomatoes, onions, garlic, allspice, cinnamon, rum, and coconut.[1] Rum-based beverages are popular on the island.[2] Since the Bahamas consist of a multitude of islands, notable culinary variations exist.

Bahamian cuisines are somewhat related to the American South.[3] A large portion of Bahamian foodstuffs are imported (cf. economy of the Bahamas).[3] International cuisine is offered, especially at hotels.[3]

Many specialty dishes are available at roadside stands, beach side, and in fine dining establishments. In contrast to the offerings in the city of Nassau and in the many hotels, “shack” type food stands/restaurants (including Goldies and Twin Brothers) are located at Arawak Cay on West Bay Street about 15 minutes from downtown Nassau and 25 minutes from Atlantis Paradise Island resort. This is a very organized and safe place to enjoy fresh seafood and all local Bahamian dishes.[2] Travelers Rest Restaurant, in Nassau, is known for serving authentic “local” foods.[2] [4]

Bahamian cuisine is showcased at many large festivals, including Independence Day (Bahamas) on July 10 (during which inhabitants prepare special dishes like guava duff), Fox Hill Day (second Tuesday in August), and Emancipation Day. Some settlements have festivals associated with the traditional crop or food of that area, such as the Pineapple Fest in Gregory Town, Eleuthera.

Bahamian traditions and food have been exported to other countries with emigrants.[5] Coconut GroveFlorida celebrates the Goombay Festival in June, transforming the area’s Grand Avenue into a Carnival (Caribbean Carnival) in celebration of Bahamian culture, Bahamian food and music (Junkanoo and ‘Rake’N’Scrape’[6]).[7] Fantasy Fest in Key West, Florida includes a two-day street party known as Goombay held in Key West’s Bahama Village neighborhood.[5] It is named after the goombay goatskin drums that generate the party’s rhythms and held in celebration of the heritage of Key West’s large Bahamian population with food, art, and dancing.[5]

Seafood

Seafood is a staple in the Bahamas. Conch, a large tropical mollusk (sea snail) with firm, white flesh, is the national dish of the Bahamas.[2] Conch can be prepared in a number of ways: served raw with lime juice, raw vegetables and even fruit called conch salad. It can be steamed, stewed, deep-fried (“cracked conch” or conch fritters), used in soups (especially conch chowder), or served in salads. Other popular shellfish are crab (including the Florida stone crab), which is often served baked, or another dish called crab fat and dough. The clawless spiny lobster, also known as rock lobster and sometimes referred to as crayfish.[1][2] Grouper is often served fried, sautéed, grilled or, more traditionally, boiled (called boiled fish) and offered with grits or Johnny cake.[3] Bonefish, found in great numbers in Bahamian waters, is served baked.[2][13]

Fish may be served escabeche style, in a mixture of lime juice or vinegar with seasoning.[1] In escabeche the fish is cooked first, differentiating it from the similarly prepared ceviche. “Stewed fish” is a method of preparing fish with celery, onions, potatoes, tomatoes and spices.

Livestock

Popular meat dishes are made with chicken,[1] pork, and goat (also referred to as mutton).[1] Iguana is still hunted and eaten, especially in the outlying islands, although some species, such as the Northern Bahamian rock iguana, are endangered. A popular Bahamian dish which is known to locals as a fast and cheap dish is fire engine which is steamed corned beef and white rice.

 

Content c/o Wikipedia

Caribbean Food Near Me

See MENU & Order

Caribbean Food Near Me – Barbadian cuisine

Caribbean food near me

Barbadian cuisine, also called Bajan cuisine, is a mixture of AfricanPortugueseIndianIrishCreole and British influences. A typical meal consists of a main dish of meat or fish, normally marinated with a mixture of herbs and spices, hot side dishes, and one or more salads. The meal is usually served with one or more sauces.[1] The national dish of Barbados is cou-cou and fried flying fish with spicy gravy.[2] Another traditional meal is pudding and souse, a dish of pickled pork with spiced sweet potatoes.[3] A wide variety of seafood and meats are also available.

Main Dishes

Main Beverages

 

Content c/o Wikipedia

Caribbean Food Near Me

See MENU & Order

Caribbean Food Near Me – Antigua and Barbuda cuisine

Caribbean food near me

Antigua and Barbuda cuisine refers to the cuisines of the Caribbean islands Antigua and Barbuda. The national dish is fungie (pronounced “foon-jee”) and pepper.[1] Fungie is a dish similar to Italian Polenta, made mostly with cornmeal.[1] Other local dishes include ducana, seasoned rice, saltfish and lobster (from Barbuda). There are also local confectioneries which include: sugarcakefudge, raspberry and tamarind stew and peanut brittle. Although these foods are indigenous to Antigua and Barbuda and to some other Caribbean countries, the local diet has diversified and now include local dishes of Jamaica, such as jerk meats, or Trinidad, such as Roti, and other Caribbean countries.

Common foods and dishes

Breakfast dishes include saltfish, eggplant (aka troba), eggs and lettuce. Lunches typically include a starch, such as ricemacaroni or pastavegetables or salad, an entree (fish, chicken, pork, beef etc.) and a side dish such as macaroni pie, scalloped potatoes or plantains. On Sundays many people in the country go to church and afterward prepare a variety of foods at home. Dinner on Sundays is often eaten earlier (around 2:00 pm) because people are often off from work on Sundays. Dinners may include pork, baked chicken, stewed lamb, or turkey, alongside rice (prepared in a variety of ways), macaroni pie, salads, and a local drink. Dessert may be ice cream and cake or an apple pie (mango and pineapple pie in their season) or gelatin.

Antiguan Butter Bread is also a main staple of Antiguan cuisine, a soft buttery loaf of bread that needs no butter added once baked. Many locals enjoy fresh baked butter bread and cheese for breakfast and throughout the day. There are many homes in neighborhoods all over Antigua that have small bakeries built on to them, where locals can go and purchase these fresh baked loaves. They are coupled with cheese, sardines, and a bright red sausage that locals sometimes call salami, and many other foods. They also have what is called provisions with most meals. Provisions are foods that are usually a root or starch like potatoes, yams, sweet potatoes, eddo, etc. During Carnival, souse, a type of soup made very spicy with pigs feet, knuckles, and tails with many onions, is a popular snack, sold by vendors on the side of the road.

Black pudding also known as blood sausage, a well seasoned sausage made with rice, meat, and blood is also enjoyed by locals in Antigua. As you travel the roads of Antigua’s countryside, you will see locals roasting fresh picked corn, usually in the husk, on makeshift grills ready to be purchased and eaten. Antigua is proud to claim their locally grown pineapples as one of the sweetest types to be found. The Antiguan Pineapple is a very small fruit but often juicy and sweet. There are small pineapple crops throughout the island.

 

Content c/o Wikipedia

Caribbean Food Near Me

See MENU & Order

Caribbean Food Near Me – British Virgin Islands cuisine

Caribbean food near me

Traditional food tends to be spicy and hearty. Many of the foods are imported due to an acquired taste for foreign foods. Local farmers grow fruits and vegetables along with the rearing of animals. Their goods are sold in local open-air markets, while supermarkets tend to carry only imported foods. Upscale restaurants often cater to tourists, serving a combination of North American dishes with tropical twists as well as local cuisine. An example of this is the addition of mango and Caribbean spices to salmon, a non-tropical fish.

Dishes

Fungi (pronounced foon-gee) is a main staple of the traditional Virgin Islands diet. It consists of cornmeal that has been boiled and cooked to a thick consistency along with okra. Fungi is usually eaten with boiled fish or saltfish.

Callaloo (sometimes spelled kallaloo) is a soup made from callaloo bush/leaf, often substituted with spinach. It consists of various meats and okra, and is boiled to a thick stew consistency.

Because of inter-Caribbean migration, many foods from other Caribbean countries have been adopted into the Virgin Islands culinary culture. For example, a popular dish is roti, of Indo-Trinidadian origin, which consists of curried vegetables and meat wrapped in a paper-thin dough.

Local fruits

Fruits consumed in the Virgin Islands include: sugar applemangopapayasoursopgenipsea grapestamarind (can be made in a sweet stew or rolled in sweet balls), and goose berries (small green sour fruit, smaller than a grape). These fruits are mainly stewed together with sugar for a sweet snack.

Drinks

“Bush tea”, a general term for any herbal tea derived from native plants (including lemongrass), is the hot beverage of choice in the Virgin Islands. Popular cold beverages include maubisorrelsoursopsea moss and passion fruit. Drinks with ginger root are also popular.

Snacks

Pate (Pronounced PAH-TEH), fried dough filled with various meats including beef, chicken, conch, or saltfish stuffed inside is a popular snack (similar to an empanada). Another popular snack is Johnnycake (originally known as ‘journey cake’), a pastry also made with fried dough.

 

Content c/o Wikipedia

Caribbean Food Near Me

See MENU & Order